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Compass Airlines Pilot Interview Profiles

Date Interviewed: January 2016
Summary of Qualifications: TT: 1350. Former CFI and Part 135.
Were you offered the job? Yes
Pilot Interview Profile:
The interview process has changed a bit since the previous gouge was written. There is no more cognitive or personality test.

I was given transportation to and from MSP and was put up in the Holiday Inn near the airport, as well as given a breakfast voucher for the hotel. The interview started at 8:00 am per the email they send out. The instructions say to take the 7:30am shuttle from the hotel to Compass, however after checking in the night before and talking to the guy at the Holiday Inn found out that it could take 25 minutes to get to Compass. As such I decided to take the 7:00am shuttle instead, as did 3 others in my interview group the next morning. One person took the 7:30 shuttle and showed up just before 8:00am. There were 5 of us total.

When we got there we were greeted by the receptionist who showed us to a small conference room. There she had us fill out some additional information about our whereabouts for the past 10 years. She also took all of our required original documents that the email says to bring. Next we were greeted by a Compass captain. He was a nice guy and gave us a slightly pre-recorded spiel on the history of Compass, line flying, benefits, etc. After that he brought us our 50 question ATP-style written exams, which we had 50 minutes to complete. Don't fret about the time, there were not a whole lot of computation-type questions, mostly stuff where you either know it or you don't. I didn't think it was too difficult, I would just study the ATP written questions in general, with emphasis on aerodynamics (stability, L/D max, etc.).

After the test we were split up into groups and were taken for our individual one on one interviews. I was interviewed with someone from HR and another captain, both very nice and approachable people. They asked about my background, leadership style, some scenario based questions, and why I wanted to come to Compass. It went for about 20 or 30 minutes. After that they tell you if you get the job or not and send you on your way back to the airport via a complimentary cab ride.
Date Interviewed: May 2015
Summary of Qualifications: former regional part 121
Were you offered the job? Yes
Pilot Interview Profile:
All good info on here. Lumosity gets your brain thinking, but none of the CPZ Cog tests are Lumosity type tests. Watch all these example videos, some of these are actually what you'll take on your interview. Click this link, then click Test Description/Examples. http://www.cogres.com/PsychometricTechnologies/CogScreen Lumosity will clear up some cobwebs in some areas of your brain that you dont use day in and day out, but Lumosity can only help so much. Remember, this isn't FEDEX or DELTA. What I mean by that is you wont be formally grilled in the Panel interview. You will get some TMAAT and WWYD questions. Is it possible to be sent home from the Cog/Personality/Written? YES! Is if possible to be sent home from the Panel Interview? Yes if you aren't the personality they're looking for or they can read right through you lying. Remember, you were invited to the interview because they are looking to hire you. If the info you gave them on your application is true and correct. You likely wont screw up the panel unless you come across super arrogant, not someone they see they can sit next to in the flight deck, or if your WWYD answers are completely out of line. Some of these tests are designed to make sure your brain doesnt function like a 4 year old and is designed to screen folks that shouldnt be in control of a plane. On the cog test where you have 1/2/3/4/5/6 with weird hieroglyphic characters attached to them, like someone said, you'll be challenged at the end of the test to recall your memory, you'll see a character and you'll have to attach a number 1-6 with the character. When you do your first Character/Number test, challenge your brain by trying to memorize what the pairings are. If you dont, you will not get the challenge test correct at the end of the test. Spend some time on that website link I provided. Same exact system!! hint hint.

Only things I have to add to the spot on previous posts are. IMO....IMO, the only way "I" felt I could've studied for this exam is to read the Aerodynamics for Naval Aviators front to back. I studied ASA Instrument and ATP oral exam guide. Helpful? yes, but only so much. "ACE the Technical Pilot Interview Book" is a great book as well, but IMO you have to read mostly the whole book. If you have plans someday like the rest of us to work at FDX UPS UAL AA DAL, "BUY THIS BOOK AND READ IT!" This CPZ written exam is very inclusive. When you start the test your score is Zero. When you get one right you get a point, when you miss one, you lose a point. How many points do you need to be invited to the panel interview? I dont know but the exam isn't organized in a manner like us pilots are used to. You dont need a 70-80% or better like typical. Weird point structure. It works for CPZ. The question banks the other applicants received were missing questions that I had and vice versa. Unless you're Rod Machado, or William Kershner, or really really good with your CFI ground school items and remember 10 years back to PVT INST COMM and ATP ground school and you picked up every little thing, you're going to miss several questions. Lots of Descent planning questions. Is it okay to miss questions? YUP "I" PASSED and got hired! The other applicants with me--and I agree--said they felt like a Student pilot at completion of the exam and felt really dumb. Study AOA stall criteria and what changes your stall angle of attack, CG, study up on L/DMax and Va and Vy and what those climb gradients actually mean. Know what fpm descent you need for a 3.0º slope at 140 160 180 480 knots groundspeed. Know your Time Distance formulas. Study up on what EPR, I've never fly a plane with EPR gauges. Know what a TRU (rectifier) does specifically. LIFT WEIGHT DRAG THRUST. TAS and Temperature. Density altitude and IAS vs. GS. When you get a question that seems to have endless data criteria that boggles your mind, "READ WHAT THEY'RE ACTUALLY ASKING FOR". You can spend 2 minutes just going thru all the data they give you but the question really only is dependent on like 2-3 data points. Read what their asking for before you go through all the data.

Super awesome people. Very welcoming and not the bit intimidating. Hotel for the interview, taxi to drug test, taxi to airport terminal, and round trip airline travel all were provided. We were offered plenty of time to go to Delta cafeteria for lunch. I was expecting a long day with just sips of water and living off of vending machines in the 5 minute break periods! That was great to go to cafeteria, what a nice surprise, I hope they continue that. As some one mentioned recently [below], and I entirely support their comment for any airline interview, but especially CPZ. Your interview starts the MOMENT you hang up the phone with HR and complete the pre-interview screening and invited to an interview. If you want this job, START REVIEWING Cog videos and studying aviation knowledge. Majority of the questions are areas we dont use anymore unless we are instructing our students. If your're a regional FO, it is highly likely you haven't used this knowledge in your day to day studies or flying and its been several years since you've utilized it. Start studying Cog, personality test taking, but mostly the Aviation Knowledge Study Guide they email you. You'll be fine on the Cog exam if you dont have severe ADHD or learning or mental disabilities.

Have answers ready for the following questions...
TELL US ABOUT YOURSELF?
WHY COMPASS?
WHY SHOULD WE HIRE YOU?
How will you benefit Compass?
WHAT ARE YOUR STRENGTHS & WEAKNESSES?
Why leaving your current employer?
A DAY YOU HAD THE MOST FUN FLYING?
DISLIKE ABOUT FLYING?
WHAT ARE YOU MOST PROUD OF?
What have you heard about Compass?
What do you enjoy doing on your time off?
TMAAT WHEN YOU GOT IN BETWEEN TWO PEOPLE?
TMAAT YOU HAD AN UPSET PASSENGER?
TMAAT YOU HAD A CONFLICT WITH A CAPTAIN?
TMAAT YOU HAD A CONFLICT WITH A SUPERVISOR?
TMAAT A FLIGHT WOULD’VE HAD A CATASTROPHIC RESULT IF YOU DIDNT INTERVENE?
TMAAT YOU HAD YOUR MOST CHALLENGING FLIGHT?
TMAAT WHEN YOU INITIATED A NEW PROGRAM?
TMAAT YOU HAD TO COUNSEL SOMEONE?
TMAAT WHEN YOU WERE THE MOST SCARED IN FLIGHT?
TMAAT YOU GOT COMPLACENT?
TMAAT YOU MADE A DECISION IN FLIGHT YOU’LL NEVER DO AGAIN?
TMAAT WHERE TEAMWORK WAS ESSENTIAL TO YOUR SUCCESS DURING A TOUGH FLIGHT?
WHAT ARE YOU REFERENCES GOING TO SAY?
WHAT ARE YOU PREVIOUS EMPLOYERS GOING TO SAY ABOUT YOUR ATTENDANCE, SICK CALLS, AND PROMPTNESS?
HOW WILL YOU HANDLE A BASE SO FAR AWAY FROM HOME?
TMAAT SOMEONE HAS CHALLENGED YOUR JUDGEMENT WHILE FLYING?
Do you have any questions?

Will you even be asked half of those questions? NO! But many of those questions are on their "list" that they randomly choose from.

7:30am hotel shuttle, for a 8am start. I got out at 2:30pm.

Good luck! CPZ seems like one of the best choices for a regional right now. I hope this gouge compliments the other GREAT gouge posts below.
Date Interviewed: September 2014
Summary of Qualifications: 1490 TT, current Pt. 135, 400 turbine, 2 internal rec's
Were you offered the job? Yes
Pilot Interview Profile:
All other gouges are spot on, the questions are all the same, the people are just as nice, the process hasn't changed. No curve-balls here.

I will simply share what I feel worked for me.

99% of your chance at succeeding in this interview happens weeks before you get there. Personally, I changed my diet, got a lot of sleep, exercised, and took supplements specifically geared towards improving memory and having a clearer mind. I freshened up the suit, did the Emerald Coast interview prep, and paid for the full version of Lumosity (11 bucks for a month). Be sure to bring your work history from airlineapps as a separate sheet for yourself as you will have to reference it several times for PRIA paperwork. Put your resume on good quality 28 pound paper, not regular comp paper. The interview email said take 730 shuttle from hotel, I took the 7 am, just in case.

As for studying, be wary of the JKT gouges you get with answers selected. I ignored the answers on the gouge and used the Turbine Pilot Flight Manual, Everything Explained, and Aerodynamics for Naval Aviators to find the CORRECT answer to each question. Through this process I memorized the correct answer and also learned the material at a correlative level. The job knowledge test was really a breeze to be honest, I was expecting way worse. I practiced the formulas from Mental Math for Pilots dozens of times and the only descent planning question I had, actually had the formula IN the question. There was one question on the test I hadn't seen in gouges and didn't know the answer to, it had to do with hand signals to lead marshals on the ground. I would glance through those.

The cognitive test was more difficult for me. Because of how important this test was, I practiced every game twice before I took the test, whether I felt like it was super easy or not. This kind of gave me a "running start" at the game versus just one practice and then GO. Out of the 12 tests, two of them I felt like I really screwed up. The one where you have to determine the rules of arrows/borders/arrow color and then a tone tells you the rule has changed. And then also the divided attention game keeping the line in center of screen while clicking number boxes of the number that had PREVIOUSLY flashed above. Also remember "Dash, X, T, O, L, U" (1-2-3-4-5-6) for the symbols/numbers matching. The dash is an underscore "__" and the T is actually an upside down "T" but you will need to short term recall this and long term recall it a few tests later. If you are playing Lumosity you should just follow their recommended training as I did think it helped my overall cognitive thinking, but if you want to be specific to the Cog test you will take, the memory and attention/divided-attention games will help the most. The Lumosity games are light-years ahead of the delta cog test in form and function, which is good as the test will be easier when you get there.

The advice I used for Personality Test was, just go with your gut instinct and be consistent.

HR portion was incredibly relaxed, they didn't grill me on all my screw ups in life too much, just was super honest and when they asked about checkride failures they just wanted to know what happened, then we moved on, I didnt even get a chance to get into the "positive take-away" from it all.. then we moved on to the TMMAT WWYD questions. How would your current employer rate your reliablity, TMAAT you had conflict in cockpit, TMAAT you did something in a plane you will never do again, WWYD if captain on vis appr lines up with wrong airport in non radar environment, WWYD if captain wants to tell pax that delay is weather not because of real cause which is maintenance. My suggestions for these, safety above all else, and honesty is the best policy.

Came out five min after HR portion done and offered the job. Did the drug test and taxi voucher to get back to airport. Great people, great experience, cant wait to start!
Date Interviewed: May 2014
Summary of Qualifications: 3000+TT, 1100 TPIC, 1500 Multi - 135/91, ATP.
Were you offered the job? Don't Know
Pilot Interview Profile:
Great group of people from what I can tell. Had to reschedule at the last minute because my flight cancelled and the HR department went out of their way to make it work.

Previous gouges and references are spot on. I'd advise anyone planning to interview to study well for the cognitive and technical computer tests. Luminosity saved my bacon on the cognitive test, and the technical questions require a correlative level of knowledge - the study guide they send you have a list of references and books you can use to help you prepare. Some of the technical questions seemed to have more than one right answer and I'm still not sure which ones I missed or got right since they don't share the results with you. The HR portion for me was with three line pilots (all fo's I think), very professional and courteous. Basic scenario questions, and a quick run through your background.

Tentatively offered the job at this time pending background check as usual. Compass seems like a good place to be in the current regional environment and their pilot morale appears to be higher than most. There were two other interviewees in my group, both current 121.
Date Interviewed: November 2013
Summary of Qualifications: ATP, MEI/CFI/CFII 3600 TT 1100 Multi 3200 Dual Given, Asst Chief 141
Were you offered the job? No
Pilot Interview Profile:
I was the only one who interviewed that day, there were two others scheduled but they had to reschedule for whatever reason. The previous gouges are pretty spot on, I will list some questions I was asked.
You are an FO standing close to the cockpit as you poor yourself a sierra mist with a lime, a passenger thinks you are making a gin and tonic and calls you out on it. WWYD
You are an FO getting onto a bus to go home, another FO friend of yours is getting off the bus to make a flight, you notice his breath smells like alcohol. WWYD (you are now going separate ways, you cannot contact him)
You are an FO, the flight is delayed 45 minutes due to a maintenance issue, the captain asks you to tell the passengers it is due to weather at the destination. WWYD
You are an FO, one hour from your destination the ATIS reports that the airport is closed. WWYD
You are the CA, you notice your FO not wearing his hat while on duty. WWYD
There were other questions with regard to your own leadership style and characteristics of a good captain etc. They also looked at college grades, and asked of any week areas during training. I was also asked what I thought my current employer would say about me and what other careers I would be interested if I couldn't fly.
All in all it was a great learning experience, the people there are super nice and very helpful. The interview was definitely geared toward someone with previous airline experience.
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